Custom Formed Spring & Metal Component Spring Manufacturer:

Visit our corporate website:  www.katyspring.com

Compression Springs Extension Springs Torsion Springs Flat Springs

P: 281-391-1888    |   F: 281-391-0666




Archive for the ‘springs supply’ Category

Monel 400 Springs | Nickel Base Alloy Wire

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

 

Monel 400 Springs Description:

 

Monel 400 nickel-copper alloy is resistant to steam and seawater at high temperatures, as well as salt and caustic solutions.
 

Engineering Data

E Mpa 179,000 Min Size (in) 0.002
E psi 26,000,000 Max Size (in) 0.375
G Mpa 66,200 Min Size (mm) 0.050
G psi 9,600,000 Max Size (in) 9.500
Density g/cm3 8.830 Surface Min b
Density lb/in3 0.319 Max Temp °C 230
Conductivity 3.5 Max Temp °F 450

All materials specifications are provided for general reference purposes only.

Monel 400 Springs Application:

Monel 400 Springs Notes:

E Mpa Young’s Modulus These factors can vary with cold work, heat treating and operational stress.
E psi
G Mpa Modulus of Rigidity
G psi
Conductivity % IACS
Surface Min Typical Surface Quality a Maximum defect depth: 0 to 0.5% of d or t
b Maximum defect depth: 1.0% of d or t
c Defect depth:less that 3.5% of d or t
Min Size Sizes commonly available for wire or strip Special sizes may be available at additional cost.
Max Size
Max Temp Maximum service temperature May vary due to operating stress

Inconel X750 Springs | Nickel Base Alloy Wire

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

Alloy X-750 has good corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. A high strength nickel chrome aluminum alloy.

 

nconel X750 Engineering Data:

E Mpa 214,000 Min Size (in) 0.004
E psi 31,000,000 Max Size (in) 0.500
G Mpa 79,300 Min Size (mm) 0.100
G psi 11,500,000 Max Size (in) 12.500
Density g/cm3 8.250 Surface Min b
Density lb/in3 0.298 Max Temp °C 595
Conductivity 1 Max Temp °F 1100

All materials specifications are provided for general reference purposes only.

Inconel X750 Springs Application:

Inconel X750 Springs Notes:

E Mpa Young’s Modulus These factors can vary with cold work, heat treating and operational stress.
E psi
G Mpa Modulus of Rigidity
G psi
Conductivity % IACS
Surface Min Typical Surface Quality a Maximum defect depth: 0 to 0.5% of d or t
b Maximum defect depth: 1.0% of d or t
c Defect depth:less that 3.5% of d or t
Min Size Sizes commonly available for wire or strip Special sizes may be available at additional cost.
Max Size
Max Temp Maximum service temperature May vary due to operating stress

Annealed, .625 wire size, wire form

Friday, June 22nd, 2018

This week’s capability picture features an annealed, .625 wire size, wire form.

This part demonstrates Katy Spring’s very unique capability to run an oval-shaped configuration on a CNC coiler.

The application for this wire form is a decorative one; after coiling, the ends are ground into a point and the oval shape slides over a two-pipe assembly creating an oversized barbed wire fence decoration. Contact Katy Spring at 281-391-1888 or visit our website www.katyspring.com

Magazine Springs

Tuesday, June 19th, 2018

A compression spring with oval or rectangular shaped coils placed inside of the magazine or charger of a firearm. A magazine spring’s function is to push up the bullets or rounds to be placed into the chamber.

Contact Katy Spring today Phone: 281-391-1888

 

Magazine Springs

magazine-springs-.032-thick-1095-Guns-and-Ammo

magazine-springs-.032-thick-1095-Guns-and-Ammo

Katy Spring Specialty Spring Design | Custom Spring Design

Tuesday, June 12th, 2018

Katy Spring Offers Specialty Spring Design.   Contact us today Phone: 281-391-1888 or visit our website:

http://www.katyspring.com/

The History of the Slinky

Tuesday, June 12th, 2018

The History of Katy Spring

The history of companies is built by many short stories; some boring, some not. We’re going to try and tell the not-so-boring ones (in our humble opinion) about Katy Spring & Mfg., Inc.; a company in Katy Texas that started with a conversation that ended something like this; “Why not.”

These are the stories about Katy Spring, small bits of a bigger story that started in 1999. The stories are still unfolding new chapters every day, thanks to our wonderful customers. It’s written for our customers and future customers so that they can get to know our company, our employees, some historical background and philosophy a little better.

The stories are not told in chronological order. This blog is more of a “Readers Digest” about Katy Spring, written in whatever random order they appear. So without further ado, let’s get started with the next read which is titled; “The History of the Slinky”

A Slinky is a pre-compressed, toy helical spring invented by Richard James in the early 1940s. It can perform a number of tricks, including traveling down a flight of steps end-over-end as it stretches and re-forms itself with the aid of gravity and its own momentum, or appear to levitate for a period of time after it has been dropped. These interesting characteristics have contributed to its success as a toy in its home country of the United States.

The Slinky was originally demonstrated at Gimbels department store in Philadelphia in November 1945. The toy was a hit, selling its entire inventory of 400 units in ninety minutes. James and his wife Betty formed James Industries in Clifton Heights, Pennsylvania to manufacture Slinky and several related toys such as the Slinky Dog and Suzie, the Slinky Worm. In 1960, James’s wife Betty became president of James Industries, and, in 1964, moved the operation back to Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. In 1998, Betty James sold the company to Poof Products, Inc.

Slinky was originally priced at $1, but many paid much more due to price increases of spring steel throughout the state of Pennsylvania; it has, however, remained modestly priced throughout its history as a result of Betty James’ concern about the toy’s affordability for poor customers. Slinky has been used other than as a toy in the playroom: it has appeared in the classroom as a teaching tool, in wartime as a radio antenna, and in physics experiments with NASA. Slinky was inducted into the National Toy Hall of Fame at The Strong in Rochester, New York, in 2000. In 2002.

Slinky (1946)

In 1943, Richard James, a naval mechanical engineer stationed at the William Cramp and Sons shipyards in Philadelphia, was developing springs that could support and stabilize sensitive instruments aboard ships in rough seas.[2][3] James accidentally knocked one of the springs from a shelf, and watched as the spring “stepped” in a series of arcs to a stack of books, to a tabletop, and to the floor, where it re-coiled itself and stood upright.[4][5] James’s wife Betty later recalled, “He came home and said, ‘I think if I got the right property of steel and the right tension; I could make it walk.'”[6] James experimented with different types of steel wire over the next year, and finally found a spring that would walk. Betty was dubious at first, but changed her mind after the toy was fine-tuned and neighborhood children expressed an excited interest in it.[5] She dubbed the toy Slinky (meaning “sleek and graceful”), after finding the word in a dictionary,[4][5] and deciding that the word aptly described the sound of a metal spring expanding and collapsing.[7]

With a US$500 loan, the couple formed James Industries (originally James Spring & Wire Company), had 400 Slinky units made by a local machine shop, hand-wrapped each in yellow paper, and priced them at $1 a piece.[5] Each was 2 1?2″ tall, and included 98 coils of high-grade blue-black Swedish steel.[8] The James’ had difficulty selling Slinky to toy stores but, in November 1945, they were granted permission to set up an inclined plane in the toy section of Gimbels department store in Philadelphia to demonstrate the toy. Slinky was a hit, and the first 400 units were sold within ninety minutes.[5][8] In 1946, Slinky was introduced at the American Toy Fair.

Hastelloy Springs

Monday, June 4th, 2018

Hastelloy spring material is a nickel-chrome-moly alloy with good corrosion resistance. Some grades add copper or tungsten for further enhancement of chemical resistance and pitting.

Call Katy Spring 281-391-1888 or visit www.katyspring.com

Hastelloy Springs Chart:

E Mpa Young’s Modulus These factors can vary with cold work, heat treating and operational stress.
E psi
G Mpa Modulus of Rigidity
G psi
Conductivity % IACS
Surface Min Typical Surface Quality a Maximum defect depth: 0 to 0.5% of d or t
b Maximum defect depth: 1.0% of d or t
c Defect depth:less that 3.5% of d or t
Min Size Sizes commonly available for wire or strip Special sizes may be available at additional cost.
Max Size
Max Temp Maximum service temperature May vary due to operating stress

Hastelloy Extension Springs
Hastelloy Compression Springs
Hastelloy Torsion Springs

Garter spring made from .040″ 302 stainless steel wire.

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018

This week’s capability video features a garter spring made from .040″ 302 stainless steel wire.

A garter spring is a coiled spring that is typically connected at each end to create a circular shape.

Garter springs are used in oil seals, shaft seals, belt-driven motors and electrical connectors.
Because of the length, a steel trough is used to assist supporting the garter spring as it is coiled off the machine.
http://katyspring.com

The History of Spring-Loaded Mouse Traps

Friday, May 11th, 2018

The History of Katy Spring

The history of companies is built by many short stories; some boring, some not. We’re going to try and tell the not-so-boring ones (in our humble opinion) about Katy Spring & Mfg., Inc.; a company in Katy Texas that started with a conversation that ended something like this; “Why not.”
These are the stories about Katy Spring, small bits of a bigger story that started in 1999. The stories are still unfolding new chapters every day, thanks to our wonderful customers. It’s written for our customers and future customers so that they can get to know our company, our employees, some historical background and philosophy a little better.

The stories are not told in chronological order. This blog is more of a “Readers Digest” about Katy Spring, written in whatever random order they appear. Without further ado, let’s get started with the next read which is titled; “The History of Spring-Loaded Mouse Traps”
Most of us our familiar with the phrase; “No need to reinvent the mouse trap.” When in fact, mouse traps have been reinvented or improved several times. And it all started with springs.
The first lethal trap was a set of spring-loaded, cast-iron jaws named “Royal No. 1”. The trap [was patented on 4 November 1879 by James M. Keep of New York, US patent 221,320. This is not the first mousetrap of this type, but the patent is for this simplified, easy to manufacture, design, which it relied on the force of a wound spring rather than gravity to capture a mouse.
The jaws operated by a coiled spring and the triggering mechanism is between the jaws, where the bait is held. The trip snaps the jaws shut, killing the mouse.

Lightweight traps of this style are now constructed from plastic. These traps do not have a powerful snap like other types. They are safer for the fingers of the person setting them than other lethal traps and can be set with the press on a tab by a single finger or even by foot.
Another spring-loaded mousetrap was first patented by William C. Hooker of Abington, IL. who received US patent 528671 for his design in 1894. A British inventor, James Atkinson a similar trap called the “Little Nipper” in 1898, including variations that had a weight-activated treadle as the trip. It trapped mouse in spring-loaded bar trap

In 1899, Atkinson patented a modification of his earlier design that transformed it from a trap that goes off by a step on the treadle into one that goes off by a pull on the bait.[8] The similarity of the latter design with Hooker’s of 1894 may have contributed to a common mistake of giving priority to Atkinson.

It is a simple device with a heavily spring-loaded bar and a trip to release it. Cheese may be placed on the trip as bait but other food such as oats, chocolate, bread, meat, butter and peanut butter are more commonly used. The spring-loaded bar swings down rapidly and with great force when anything, usually a mouse, touches the trip. The design is such that the mouse’s neck or spinal cord can be broken, or its ribs or skull crushed, by the force of the bar. The trap can be held over a bin and the dead mouse released into it by pulling the bar. In the case of rats which are much larger than mice, a much larger version of the same type of trap is used to kill them. Some spring mousetraps have a plastic extended trip. The larger trip has two notable differences over the smaller traditional type: increased leverage, which requires less force from the rodent to trip it; and the larger surface area of the trip increases the probability that even the most cunning of rodents will set off the trap. The exact latching mechanism holding the trip varies a lot and some need to be set right at the edge in order to be sensitive enough to catch cautious mice.

In 1899, John Mast of Lititz, Pennsylvania, filed a U.S. patent for a modification of Hooker’s design that can be “readily set or adjusted with absolute safety to the person attending thereto, avoiding the liability of having his fingers caught or injured by the striker when it is prematurely or accidentally freed or released.” He obtained the patent on 17 November 1903. After William Hooker had sold his interest in the Animal Trap Company of Abingdon, Illinois, and founded the new Abingdon Trap Company in 1899, the Animal Trap Company moved to Lititz, Pennsylvania, and fused with the J.M. Mast Manufacturing Company in 1905. The new and bigger company in Lititz, however, retained the name Animal Trap Company. Compounding these different but related patents and companies may have contributed to the widespread mis-attribution of priority to Mast rather than Hooker.

Since the spring-loaded mouse traps, there have been other types of traps invented including; electric traps, live-capture mouse traps, glue traps, barrel traps and disposable traps.

Double Body Torsion Springs

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018

Double body torsion springs are used as a left hand torsion spring and a right hand torsion spring connected at the center.

Seeking  Double body torsion springs ? Call 281-391-1888 Katy Spring today or visit our website  www.katyspring.com

Double Body Torsion SPrings

Double Body Torsion Springs

Double Body Torsion SPrings

Double Body Torsion Springs

Double Body Torsion Spring

Double Body Torsion Springs

Double Body Torsion Springs

Wednesday, April 25th, 2018

Double Body Torsion Springs Contact Katy Spring http://www.katyspring.com/ or call 281-391-1888

Double Body Torsion Spring

Double Body Torsion Spring

Torsion springs are helical springs that exert a torque or rotary force and are subject to bending stresses. Torsion springs should always wind up from the free position – never to unwind from the free position.

Flat form made from 301 stainless steel strip

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

This week’s capability video features a flat form made from 301 stainless steel strip.

The operation being performed here is a simple bend made by a Diacro, manually-controlled bender used for short run jobs, typically under 1000 units.

This component is used in disc storage products. Call 281-391-1888 or visit  http://katyspring.com/  

Flat Form made from 301 stainless steel strip

Flat Form made from 301 stainless steel strip

The History of Katy Spring | Leaf Springs & Coil Springs

Tuesday, April 10th, 2018

The History of Katy Spring

The history of companies is built by many short stories; some boring, some not. We’re going to try and tell the not-so-boring ones (in our humble opinion) about Katy Spring & Mfg., Inc.; a company in Katy Texas that started with a conversation that ended something like this; “Why not.”
These are the stories about Katy Spring, small bits of a bigger story that started in 1999. The stories are still unfolding new chapters every day, thanks to our wonderful customers. It’s written for our customers and future customers so that they can get to know our company, our employees, some historical background and philosophy a little better.

The stories are not told in chronological order. This blog is more of a “Readers Digest” about Katy Spring, written in whatever random order they appear. So without further ado, let’s get started with the next read which is titled; “The History of Automotive Springs”

We make springs for many types of industries. Quite often, we’re asked if we make springs for the automotive industry. The short answer is, “yes.” The long answer is to follow. While automotive springs are not Katy Spring’s main industry that we serve, the history of automotive springs is an interesting topic.
The modern automobile suspension system was developed in 1904. Automobile suspension was quickly upgraded in 1906 when front coil springs were mounted on a flexible, hickory axel that dampened spring bounce.

Leaf springs were first used on carriages. In 1804, the stackable leaf spring was invented and used primarily in rear suspension systems.
Coil springs were experimented with further, but car makers stood behind leaf springs, because leaf springs were less costly and could support varying weights by simply changing the roundness of the leaf spring.

Coil springs were first invented in 1763.

In 1908, Henry Ford used leaf springs mounted on each axel as opposed to having one mounted to each wheel. Ford later discovered he could gain more strength by using vanadium steel in the Model T.

Coil springs were not used in the front suspension again until 1934 when all the major auto makers reintroduced coil springs into the front suspension, this time with each wheel having its own, independent spring. Around the same time, cars also begin to use shock absorbers and low pressure tires to further improve suspension systems and lessening spring bounce.

Rear-end coil springs were first introduced by Buick in 1938. The larger cars generally had leaf springs, while smaller cars had coil springs.
Even today, car suspension systems are being constantly improved and the leaf and coil spring still plays a vital role in the automobile suspension system.

Punch press operation for a carbon steel, flat form.

Wednesday, April 4th, 2018

This week’s capability video features a punch press operation for a carbon steel, flat form.

The flat form is part of an assembly, used in the commercial trucking industry. For safety purposes, two hands are required to activate the punch paddles

Blue Powder Coated Compression Springs

Monday, April 2nd, 2018

Blue Powder Coated Compression Springs

.030 music wire spring, a deep-draw stamping, a zinc-plated pin

Sunday, March 18th, 2018

This week’s capability video features a spring assembly. The assembly includes a .030 music wire spring, a deep-draw stamping, a zinc-plated pin and a lock washer.
The assembly allows the spring to be preset, further relieving spring stress. As a safety feature, the operator must press both paddles with both hands which compresses the spring and allows the washer to secure the internal pin.

.030 music wire spring, a deep-draw stamping, a zinc-plated pin

The History of Katy Spring- manufacturing rectangular-wire springs.

Wednesday, March 14th, 2018

The History of Katy Spring

The history of companies is built by many short stories; some boring, some not. We’re going to try and tell the not-so-boring ones (in our humble opinion) about Katy Spring & Mfg., Inc.; a company in Katy Texas that started with a conversation that ended something like this; “Why not.”

These are the stories about Katy Spring, small bits of a bigger story that started in 1999. The stories are still unfolding new chapters every day, thanks to our wonderful customers. It’s written for our customers and future customers so that they can get to know our company, our employees, some historical background and philosophy a little better.

The stories are not told in chronological order. This blog is more of a “Readers Digest” about Katy Spring, written in whatever random order they appear. So without further ado, let’s get started with the next read which is titled; “We’ve Always Done it That Way.”

It’s one of the most rewarding things we do in this business; help a customer redesign a spring that truly has a high impact on improving their business in terms of profitability, safety, and in some cases peace of mind. It also takes a lot of courage for a customer to agree change a design and not be satisfied with the status quo that just because “We’ve always done it that way,” doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the best way. Change does involve risk.

There was one customer in particular that has a well-known brand and history in the U.S. who took that very risk to improve their position. Katy Spring was fortunate enough to be asked to take on the project, which we eagerly did, because assisting customers with spring design is one of the best things we do; mainly due to our “three generations of spring maker” knowledge that continues to be past on to current and future Katy Spring employees.

For this particular project, a rectangular-wire compression spring was being used for an application that was for the automotive market. The spring assisted in the braking mechanism so safety was an important factor and concern in moving forward with a design change.

The reason the design change was requested was due to the expense and difficulty involved in manufacturing rectangular-wire springs. The reason rectangular-wire compression springs are generally used in the first place; is when a lot of power is needed in a small space. In this case, the space required was not that small and there was room to use round music wire, a common, readily-available material that requires much less set-up time and run time to manufacture. The original rectangular spring turned out to be overkill in terms of force required and when we worked on a round-wire design, Katy Spring came to the conclusion that round wire will be more than adequate to do the job.

After several months of testing, the new spring design passed inspection and today, is one of this customer’s highest-volume springs used.

.177-plated-wire-form-used-in-a-medical-product-assembly

Monday, March 12th, 2018

.177-plated-wire-form-used-in-a-medical-product-assembly

 

.177-plated-wire-form-used-in-a-medical-product-assembly

Wire forms come in endless varieties of shapes, sizes, and materials. Several materials used to manufacture wire forms include; high carbon spring steel, phosphor-bronze, brass, beryllium-copper, stainless steel, nickel-silver, high-nickel specialty alloys, and non-tempered wire. Wire forming companies such as Katy Spring can bend wire into fabricated shapes such as clips, pins, springs, rings, hooks, and wire racks to name a few.

Torsion spring with lateral legs

Tuesday, March 6th, 2018

This week’s capability video features a torsion spring with lateral legs, made from .062 music wire. This spring is being made on Katy Spring’s CNC wire former, then stress relieved in the in-line oven at 550 degrees F for thirty minutes. The application for this spring is for downhole-oilfield technology.

The History of Katy Spring

Monday, February 26th, 2018

The History of Katy Spring

The history of companies is built by many short stories; some boring, some not. We’re going to try and tell the not-so-boring ones (in our humble opinion) about Katy Spring & Mfg., Inc.; a company in Katy Texas that started with a conversation that ended something like this; “Why not.”

These are the stories about Katy Spring, small bits of a bigger story that started in 1999. The stories are still unfolding new chapters every day, thanks to our wonderful customers. It’s written for our customers and future customers so that they can get to know our company, our employees, some historical background and philosophy a little better.

The stories are not told in chronological order. This blog is more of a “Readers Digest” about Katy Spring, written in whatever random order they appear. So without further ado, let’s get started with the next read which is titled; “The Tractor.”

In a start-up business, almost everything is done internally that can be done internally, in order to save on costs and simply, because there’s no one else to delegate to when starting a business.  This includes tasks such as cleaning the restrooms, emptying trash cans, packaging products, painting springs with a spray paint can in a shoe box (because the customer wanted red springs) to less meditative tasks such as interviewing, meetings with customers and vendors, assisting with a spring design, running capability studies and so on; all of which Katy Spring owners have happily participated in throughout the course of Katy Spring’s existence.  Even some of these tasks that can be outsourced are handled by the owners now, such as mowing the grass…what?

Yes, the twenty acres that Katy Spring occupies is mostly coastal grass and needs to be mowed, in the summer about once a month or so.  In 2017 the landscape changed quite a bit though when Katy Spring owners decided to develop about five acres of the property into two businesses; an RV and Boat Storage facility called; “West Katy RV and Boat Storage,” http://westkatyrvboatstorage.com/.  The other business is a business park, featuring business space for small businesses, starting at about thirty seven hundred square feet of build-to-suite spaces.  Katy Spring was the first tenant of the “Schlipf Road Business Park,” leasing out ten thousand square feet for finished goods storage to support customers that utilize Katy Spring’s Stocking Agreement;  http://www.katyspring.com/KS-Web-Stocking-Agreement-Option2.pdf.

Even though Katy Spring has a landscaping service to mow the grass, occasionally it’s fun to jump on the tractor and take a ride, enjoy the outdoors and cut some grass.

All sounds fun, right?  And it was, until the tractor got stuck. Ouch!

When one usually gets something stuck in a field, what’s used to pull it out?   A tractor is typically the answer of course.   So getting one’s only tractor stuck is like driving in a small town and being hit by an ambulance in a town that has only one ambulance.

The area the tractor was stuck in was wet.  The obvious solution is to wait for it to dry up then simply drive it out of the rut.  However, it rained more, a lot more and the tractor sunk even deeper, all the way up to the axel.

So what now?  Of course, wait for it to dry again and get a bigger tractor to pull ours out, which we did and we love our neighbors for it.

No lessons to be learned from this story really, unless I should state the obvious; mow when it’s dry or, if not, avoid the mud.  Stuff happens; we deal with it and move on as we have for almost nineteen years.  Summer’s almost here and mowing season begins soon!

.312 stainless steel torsion spring, shot peened for added life and reduced stress

Thursday, February 15th, 2018

312-stainless-steel-torsion-spring,-shot-peened-for-added-life-and-reduced-stress

.072 300 series stainless compression spring used in valve actuators

Saturday, February 10th, 2018

.072 300 series stainless compression spring used in valve actuators

 

.072 300 series stainless compression spring used in valve actuators

.041 music wire, wire form used in the military AR weapons

Thursday, February 8th, 2018

041 music wire, wire form used in the military AR weapons http://katyspring.com/

 

041 music wire, wire form used in the military AR weapons

.177 plated music wire used in the medial industry

Sunday, February 4th, 2018

177 plated music wire used in the medical industry http://katyspring.com/

 

177 plated music wire used in the medial industry

.050 oil tempered, double body torsion spring used in an instrumentation application

Friday, February 2nd, 2018

.050 oil tempered, double body torsion spring used in an instrumentation application