Custom Formed Spring & Metal Component Spring Manufacturer:

Visit our corporate website:  www.katyspring.com

Compression Springs Extension Springs Torsion Springs Flat Springs

P: 281-391-1888    |   F: 281-391-0666




.050” music wire form for the HVAC industry

December 14th, 2018

.050” music wire form for the HVAC industry.   For wire forms or custom wire forms, contact Katy Spring today.  Visit our website https://www.katyspring.com/

.050” music wire form for the HVAC industry

.050” music wire form for the HVAC industry

Wire forms come in endless varieties of shapes, sizes, and materials.

.040” 302 stainless steel double-body torsion spring for the trucking industry

December 14th, 2018

.040” 302 stainless steel double-body torsion spring for the trucking industry.

For double-body-torsion springs or custom double-body-torsion springs, Contact Katy Spring Today, visit our website: https://www.katyspring.com/

.040” 302 stainless steel double-body torsion spring for the trucking industry

.040” 302 stainless steel double-body torsion spring for the trucking industry

The Future of Springs | Katy Spring

December 14th, 2018

The History of Katy Spring

The history of companies is built by many short stories; some boring, some not. We’re going to try and tell the not-so-boring ones (in our humble opinion) about Katy Spring & Mfg., Inc.; a company in Katy Texas that started with a conversation that ended something like this; “Why not.”

These are the stories about Katy Spring, small bits of a bigger story that started in 1999. The stories are still unfolding new chapters every day, thanks to our wonderful customers. It’s written for our customers and future customers so that they can get to know our company, our employees, some historical background and philosophy a little better.

The stories are not told in chronological order. This blog is more of a “Readers Digest” about Katy Spring, written in whatever random order they appear. So, without further ado, let’s get started with the next read which is titled; “The Future of Springs”

The future of springs holds a lot of unknowns. Manufacturing techniques continue to evolve, and will continue to evolve.

One of the hottest industries for the future of spring manufacturing involves electronics and micro-spring manufacturing methods.

Demands of the rapidly growing computer and cellular phone industries are pushing spring manufacturers to develop reliable, cost-effective techniques for making very small springs. Springs that support keys on touchpads and keyboards are important, but there are less apparent applications as well. For instance, a manufacturer of test equipment used in semiconductor production has developed a microspring contact technology. Thousands of tiny springs, only 40 mils (0.040 in or 1 mm) high, are bonded to individual contact points of a semiconductor wafer. When this wafer is pressed against a test instrument, the springs compress, establishing highly reliable electrical connections.

Medical devices also use very small springs. A coiled spring has been developed for use in the insertion end of a catheter or an endoscope. Made of wire 0.0012 in (30 micrometers or 0.030 mm) in diameter, the spring is 0.0036 in (0.092 mm) thick—about the same as a human hair. The Japanese company that developed this spring is attempting to make it even smaller.

The ultimate miniaturization accomplished so far was accomplished in 1997 by an Austrian chemist named Bernard Krautler. He built a molecular spring by stringing 12 carbon atoms together and attaching a vitamin B12 molecule to each end of the chain by means of a cobalt atom. In the relaxed state the chain has a zigzag shape; when it is wetted with water, however, it kinks tightly together. Adding cyclodextrin causes the chain to return to its relaxed state. No practical application of this spring has yet been found, but research continues.

375 Inconel® x750 compression springs

December 5th, 2018

375 Inconel® x750 compression springs with green color code stripe for the actuator industry

For more information Contact Katy Spring today to order 375 Inconel® x750 compression springs or custom compression springs

375 Inconel® x750 compression spring with green color code stripe for the actuator industry

375 Inconel® x750 compression spring with green color code stripe for the actuator industry

 

Compression Springs  | Custom Compression Springs

.177 17-7 stainless steel compression springs for the valve industry

December 5th, 2018

Stainless Steel Compression Springs

For more information Contact Katy Spring today to order stainless steel compression springs or custom compression springs

.177 17-7 stainless steel compression springs for the valve industry

.177 17-7 stainless steel compression springs for the valve industry

Torsion Springs Manufacturer | Custom Torsion Springs

November 21st, 2018

Torsion Springs | Custom Torsion Springs

Torsion Springs

Torsion springs are helical springs that exert a torque or rotary force and are subject to bending stresses. Torsion springs should always wind up from the free position – never to unwind from the free position. As they wind up, torsion springs reduce in diameter and their length becomes longer. Such springs should be supported over a rod whenever possible. Some spacing should remain between coils to minimize friction which can alter torque and deflection. 

Torsion Springs

Double Body Torsion Spring

.080 Brass Double Body Torsion Spring

Torsion Spring

Torsion Spring

Double Body Torsion Springs

Double Body Torsion Spring

Compression Spring Grinding

November 16th, 2018

Compression Spring Grinding

Compression spring ends often are ground to increase operational life and to allow the spring to sit squarely on the load-bearing surface. Grinding of compression springs also increases the number of active coils and the wire diameter available in a given volume of space, which can result in higher loads or lower stresses. As a modern compression springs manufacturer, our facilities operate with a wide variety of equipment – from hand-operated grinding tools to automatic, high-speed vertical spindle disc grinders.

Compression Spring Grinding

Compression Spring Grinding

 

Compression Spring Shapes & Sizes
.007 to .625 inches in spring wire diameter
Up to 2.0 Inches
Compression Spring Round Wire
Compression Spring Square Wire
Compression Spring Rectangular Wire
Compression Spring Special Section Wire

7 foot long annealed carbon strip wire formed

November 14th, 2018

This month’s capability image features a seven foot-long, annealed carbon strip formed into a twisted configuration.
After the form, the strips are bundled and palletized to prevent deformation during transportation.

Learn more by calling 281-391-1888 or visit our website : https://www.katyspring.com

 

7 foot long annealed carbon strip wire formed

7 foot long annealed carbon strip wire formed

 

Wire Forms  |  Wire form Manufacturers  | Spring Manufacturer

 

 

 

 

History of Trampoline Springs

November 13th, 2018

The History of Katy Spring

The history of companies is built by many short stories; some boring, some not. We’re going to try and tell the not-so-boring ones (in our humble opinion) about Katy Spring & Mfg., Inc.; a company in Katy Texas that started with a conversation that ended something like this; “Why not.”

These are the stories about Katy Spring, small bits of a bigger story that started in 1999. The stories are still unfolding new chapters every day, thanks to our wonderful customers. It’s written for our customers and future customers so that they can get to know our company, our employees, some historical background and philosophy a little better.

The stories are not told in chronological order. This blog is more of a “Readers Digest” about Katy Spring, written in whatever random order they appear. So, without further ado, let’s get started with the next read which is titled; “History of Trampoline Springs.

The trampoline-like life nets once used by firefighters to catch people jumping out of burning buildings were invented in 1887.

Circus Royal refers to performance on trampoline. The device is thought to have been more like a springboard than the fabric-and-coiled-springs apparatus presently in use.

These may not be the true antecedents of the modern sport of trampolining, but indicate that the concept of bouncing off a fabric surface has been around for some time. In the early years of the 20th century, some acrobats used a “bouncing bed” on the stage to amuse audiences. The bouncing bed was, a form of small trampoline covered by bedclothes, on which acrobats performed mostly comedy routines.

According to circus folklore, the trampoline was supposedly first developed, with the possibility of using the trapeze safety net as a form of propulsion and landing device and experimented with different systems of suspension, eventually reducing the net to a practical size for separate performance. While trampoline-like devices were used for shows and in the circus, the story of Trampolin is almost certainly apocryphal. No documentary evidence has been found to support it.

First modern trampolines

The first modern trampoline was built by George Nissen and Larry Griswold in 1936.[2] Nissen was a gymnastics and diving competitor and Griswold was a tumbler on the gymnastics team, both at the University of Iowa, United States. They had observed trapeze artists using a tight net to add entertainment value to their performance and experimented by stretching a piece of canvas, in which they had inserted grommets along each side, to an angle iron frame by means of coiled springs. It was initially used to train tumblers but soon became popular in its own right. Nissen explained that the name came from the Spanish trampolín, meaning a diving board. Nissen had heard the word on a demonstration tour in Mexico in the late 1930s and decided to use an anglicized form as the trademark for the apparatus.[3]

In 1942, Griswold and Nissen created the Griswold-Nissen Trampoline & Tumbling Company, and began making trampolines commercially in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
The generic term for the trademarked trampoline was a rebound tumbler[4] and the sport began as rebound tumbling. It has since lost its trademark and has become a generic trademark.

Early in their development Nissen anticipated trampolines being used in a number of recreational areas, including those involving more than one participant on the same trampoline. One such game was Spaceball—a game of two teams of two on a single trampoline with specially constructed end “walls” and a middle “wall” through which a ball could be propelled to hit a target on the other side’s end wall.[5]

.062 music wire form mechanical seals

November 8th, 2018

.062 music wire form mechanical seals

.062 music wire wire form mechanical seals

.062 music wire form mechanical seals

 

Several methods to manufacture wire forms are used depending on the size of the part and quantity run. Secondary operations, bending, drilling, tapping, machining, welding, heat treating, grinding are used for short-run quantities. Fourslide, multislide, stamping, and progressive die operations are used for long-runs (usually 20,000 + pcs.), and require special tooling. Many times wire forms are fabricated and welded into assemblies such as baskets or other material handling components.

.80 stainless steel wire form safety and construction

November 8th, 2018

.080 stainless steel wire form safety and construction

.080 stainless steel wire form safety and construction

.080 stainless steel wire form safety and construction

Wire forms come in endless varieties of shapes, sizes, and materials. Several materials used to manufacture wire forms include; high carbon spring steel, phosphor-bronze, brass, beryllium-copper, stainless steel, nickel-silver, high-nickel specialty alloys, and non-tempered wire. Wire forming companies such as Katy Spring can bend wire into fabricated shapes such as clips, pins, springs, rings, hooks, and wire racks to name a few.

Fastest-Running Job 20,000 springs per hour! 

October 25th, 2018

See the latest and now, fastest-running job for Katy Spring; 20,000 springs per hour!  This .023” stainless steel compression spring, used in the fiber optics industry, highlights the capabilities of Katy Spring’s CNC, high-speed coilers.

Special kudos to Manuel and his team for the set-up on this job, which greatly increased the speed while maintaining high-quality parts.

Learn more visit our website  www.katyspring.com  or call 281-391-1888

 

Katy Spring is proud to have participated in Dow 1st Annual United Way Fishing Tournament. 

October 16th, 2018

“A good time for a good cause.  Katy Spring is proud to have participated in Dow 1st Annual United Way Fishing Tournament.  Congratulations to James West, Katy Spring’s President for landing the winning Redfish!  A special thanks to our Captain, Bill Chumley.”

www.Katyspring.com

www.katyspring.com

Spring Mattress manufacturers.

September 17th, 2018

The History of Katy Spring

The history of companies is built by many short stories; some boring, some not. We’re going to try and tell the not-so-boring ones (in our humble opinion) about Katy Spring & Mfg., Inc.; a company in Katy Texas that started with a conversation that ended something like this; “Why not.”
These are the stories about Katy Spring, small bits of a bigger story that started in 1999. The stories are still unfolding new chapters every day, thanks to our wonderful customers. It’s written for our customers and future customers so that they can get to know our company, our employees, some historical background and philosophy a little better.

The stories are not told in chronological order. This blog is more of a “Readers Digest” about Katy Spring, written in whatever random order they appear. So, without further ado, let’s get started with the next read which is titled; “Bed Springs.”

The conversation usually goes like this:
THEM: So, what’s your business?
ME: Springs
THEM: Springs?
ME: Yes, springs (I make a pinching gesture with my hand).
THEM: Oh, springs!
ME: Yes, springs.
THEM: So, what do you make springs for, like bed springs?
ME: (This is where I go into my elevator pitch) No, not bed springs, we are a custom spring manufacturer and make springs for OEM’s like (and I name several well-known companies).

So, I started thinking. How are bed springs made, or mattresses in general? Here’s what I found.
From madehow.com:

• 1 Most mattress manufacturers subcontract the production of the innerspring unit to an outside firm that specializes in making springs. Once the completed spring unit is received and inspected, the workers manually apply the insulator. Next, they apply the cushioning layers that will determine the feel and comfort of the final product.
• 2 While the mattress is being “built up” in one part of the plant, the decorative cover that will serve as the exterior for the top, bottom and sides is being made in another part. Usually this cover is made on a giant quilting machine, which controls a multitude of needles that stitch the cover to a layer of backing material. The stitching chosen serves both useful and ornamental purposes, as it must prevent the mattress cover from slipping or creeping over the layers of cushioning in addition to creating a visually pleasing exterior.
• 3 Once the fabric is quilted, it is cut into panels that will fit the top and bottom of the mattress. The side panels are often cut from this same composite or made separately on a border machine. If side handles or vents are to be added, they are attached to the side panels before these are applied to the mattress.

Read more: http://www.madehow.com/Volume-1/Mattress.html#ixzz5RNM8zz8P
Maybe I should start talking to mattress manufacturers.

Katy Spring’s Capabilities:

September 7th, 2018

texas-custom-spring-manufacturer

 

Capabilities

Katy Spring & Mfg., Inc. is a custom manufacturer of formed metal components including compression springs, torsion springs and extension springs, stamping, and wire forms.

Equipment highlights include:

  • high speed automatic coilers for economical long runs
  • manual spring winders for short-run, quick turn production and prototypes
  • automatic and manual presses
  • ovens for stress relieving and heat treating
  • load testing equipment
  • a variety of specialty equipment including jigs and tools for all types of metal forming.
  • CNC coiling

 

 

.042” 302 stainless steel compression springs

September 7th, 2018

.042” 302 stainless steel compression springs used for commercial products

Contact Katy Spring today or visit our website www.katyspring.com

 

042” 302 stainless steel compression springs used for commercial products .042” 302 stainless steel compression springs used for commercial products

 

 

Katy Spring & Manufacturing Benefits:

August 28th, 2018

  • No automatic expedite fees
  • Volume-discounted pricing structure
  • A one-order-at-a time quality and service philosophy
  • Flexible lead times
  • Advanced change-in-schedule notification
  • Long-term and stocking agreement programs offered for some projects
  • Diversified customer and market base
  • Advanced spring-manufacturing technology
  • 75 combined years of spring design assistance
  • Owned by 3 generations of spring makers
  • Customer service training throughout the entire organization
  • 50,000 square feet of space on 20 acres, owned by Katy Spring shareholders
  • Warranty and guarantee in writing.

For more information contact call  281-391-1888  or visit our website www.katyspring.com

Extension Spring Design

August 28th, 2018

Helical extension springs exert a force by pulling or stretching them.  Usually, they are made from round wire and are close-wound with the initial tension between the coils.  Their ends can be formed with loops in many varieties to attach to their applications.

 

Extension Springs .040 Zin plated music wire extension for marine products

Extension Springs .040 Zin plated music wire extension for marine products

 

Material data sheet:

Common Spring Materials

Max
Recommended %
Tensile

St

Sb

Music Wire

45

75

Chrome Silicon

45

75

Chrome Vanadium

45

75

302 Stainless Steel

35

55

316 Stainless Steel

35

55

17-7 Stainless Steel

45

75

 

The following tables give tolerances that can be used as a reference.  Actual manufacturing tolerances will depend on the spring specifics.

 

Outside Diameter Tolerances:

Wire
Diameter
(in)

   

Spring Index, D/d

   

4

6

     8            10           12

14

16

0.015

0.002 0.002 0.003 0.004 0.005 0.006 0.007

0.023

0.002 0.003 0.004 0.006 0.007 0.008

0.01

0.035

0.002 0.004 0.006 0.007 0.009 0.011 0.013

0.051

0.003 0.005 0.007

0.01

0.012 0.015 0.017

0.076

0.004 0.007

0.01

0.013 0.016 0.019 0.022

0.114

0.006 0.009 0.013 0.018 0.021 0.025 0.029

0.171

0.008 0.012 0.017 0.023 0.028 0.033 0.038

0.25

0.011 0.015 0.021 0.028 0.035 0.042 0.049

0.375

0.016

0.02

0.026 0.037 0.046 0.054 0.064

0.5

0.021

0.03

0.04

0.062

0.08

0.1

0.125

 

 

Spring Free Length Tolerances

.5 in or less

0.02

0.5″ to 1.0″

0.03

1″ to 2.0″

0.04

2″ to 4″

0.06

4″ to 8″

0.093

8″ to 16″

0.156

16″ to 24″

0.218

Stainless Steel Wire Springs

August 23rd, 2018

 

stainless--steel-extension-springs

stainless–steel-extension-springs


Wire Type

Material

Nominal Analysis

Modulus of Elasticity E

Modulus in Torsion

Max Operating Temp. F

Rockwell Hardness
Stainless Steel Wire AISI 302/304 ASTM A 313 Cr 17.-19.% Ni 8.-10.% 28 (193) 10 (69.0) 550 C35-45
AISI 316 ASTM A 313 Cr 16.-18% Ni 10.-14.% Mo 2.-3.% 28 (193) 10 (69.0) 550 C35-45
17-7 PH ASTM A 313 (631) Cr 16.-18.% Ni 10.-14.% Al 0.75-1.5% 29.5 (203) 11 (78.5) 650 C38-57
  • AISI 302/304 Stainless Steel Wire Springs

    – This is the most popular stainless steel alloy for springs, exhibiting good tensile strength, high corrosion resistance, good heat resistance, and slight magnetic properties. It maintains its strength at temperatures up to 550 degrees F. 302/304 is cold drawn and meets ASTM A 313 standards.

  • AISI 316 Stainless Steel Wire Springs

    – 316 stainless steel wire exhibits better corrosion resistance than 302/304 alloy wire, though it has less tensile strength. It has superior cold forming properties and exhibits short term tensile and creep strength at temperatures up to 550 degrees F. It is used for springs in corrosive environments that do not require high impact or load strength. It meets ASTM A 313 standards.

  • 17-7 PH (AISI 631) Stainless Steel Springs

    – An excellent material for all types of spring applications, 17-7 stainless steel wire offers long life under extreme conditions. It exhibits superior fatigue properties, elasticity, strength-to-weight ration, high yield strength, ductility, and good corrosion resistance, at temperatures up to 650 degrees F.   It meets ASTM A 313 standards.

Long Compression Springs | Extra Long Compression Springs

August 22nd, 2018

Seeking Long Compression Springs or Extra Long Compression Springs?    Contact Katy Spring Phone: 281-391-1888  or visit our website:

http://www.katyspring.com/

Long Compression Springs

Long Compression Springs

Compression Spring terms:

August 22nd, 2018

 

stainless steel compression springs

stainless steel compression springs

Compression Spring terms:

 

Active Coils- the coils that deflect when a compression spring is under load.

Buckling the point at which a compression spring bends when a long, slender compression spring is under load.

Closed Ends- the point at the end of a compression spring where the end coils touch.

Closed and Ground End- same as closed ends except the ends of the compression spring is ground flat.

Closed Wound- the state in which a compression spring is coiled with all adjacent coils touching.

Deflection- motion of the compression spring when placed under load.

Elastic limit- the maximum amount that compression spring wire can be placed under load before the compression spring sets.

Endurance limit- the maximum compression spring material can operate indefinitely without failure during minimum stress.

Free length- the overall length of a compression spring under no load.

Frequency- the lowest rate of vibration for a compression spring while ends are held stationary.

Hysteresis- the amount of energy lost in a compression spring during cycling.

Mean diameter- the outside diameter of a compression spring minus one wire diameter.

Modulus- the coefficient in stiffness of a compression spring.

Open ends- the same pitch throughout a compression spring

Open ends ground- same as open ends but with ground ends

Permanent set- when a compression spring is deflected beyond its elastic limit as does not return to its original position.

Pitch- the distance of one wire mean to the adjacent wire mean in a compression spring.

Rate- the change in compression spring load between units of measure.

Set removal- compressing a compression spring to its solid height to achieve desired length and reduce elastic limit.

Set- permanent distortion caused by compressing a compression spring beyond its elastic limit.

Slenderness ration- ratio of length to mean diameter in a compression spring.

Solid height- the position of a compression spring when compressed, all adjacent coils are touching.

Spring Index- the ratio of mean coil diameter to wire diameter in a compression spring.

Squareness- the angular difference between a compression spring axis and plane ends.

Total coils- the number of active coils plus the inactive compression spring coils.

The History of Watch Springs

August 14th, 2018

The history of companies is built by many short stories; some boring, some not. We’re going to try and tell the not-so-boring ones (in our humble opinion) about Katy Spring & Mfg., Inc.; a company in Katy Texas that started with a conversation that ended something like this; “Why not.”

These are the stories about Katy Spring, small bits of a bigger story that started in 1999. The stories are still unfolding new chapters every day, thanks to our wonderful customers. It’s written for our customers and future customers so that they can get to know our company, our employees, some historical background and philosophy a little better.

The stories are not told in chronological order. This blog is more of a “Readers Digest” about Katy Spring, written in whatever random order they appear. So, without further ado, let’s get started with the next read which is titled; “The History Watch Springs”

Mainsprings appeared in the first spring powered clocks, in 15th century Europe. It replaced the weight hanging from a cord wrapped around a pulley, which was the power source used in all previous mechanical clocks. Around 1400 coiled springs began to be used in locks, and many early clockmakers were also locksmiths. Springs were applied to clocks to make them smaller and more portable than previous weight driven clocks, evolving into the first pocket watches by 1600. Many sources erroneously credit the invention of the mainspring to the Nuremberg clockmaker Peter Henlein.  However, many references in 15th century sources to portable clocks ‘without weights’, and at least two surviving examples, show that spring driven clocks existed by the early years of that century.

The first mainsprings were made of steel without tempering or hardening processes. They didn’t run very long, and had to be wound twice a day. Henlein was noted for making watches that would run 40 hours between windings. The modern watch mainspring is a long strip of hardened and blued steel, or specialized steel alloy, 20–30 cm long and 0.05-0.2 mm thick. The mainspring in the common 1-day movement is calculated to enable the watch to run for 36 to 40 hours, i.e. 24 hours between daily windings with a power-reserve of 12 to 16 hours, in case the owner is late winding the watch. This is the normal standard for hand-wound as well as self-winding watched, used in clocks meant to be wound weekly, provide power for at least 192 hours but use longer mainsprings and bigger barrels.  Lock mainsprings are similar to watch springs, only larger.

Since 1945, carbon steel alloys have been increasingly superseded by newer special alloys (iron, nickel and chromium with the addition of cobalt, molybdenum, or beryllium), and also by coldrolled alloys (‘structural hardening’). Known to watchmakers as ‘white metal’ springs (as opposed to blued carbon steel), these are stainless and have a higher elastic limit. They are less subject to permanent bending (becoming tired’) and there is scarcely any risk of their breaking. Some of them are also practically non-magnetic.

In their relaxed form, mainsprings are made in three distinct shapes:

  • Spiral coiled: These are coiled in the same direction throughout, in a simple spiral.
  • Semi-reverse: The outer end of the spring is coiled in the reverse direction for less than one turn (less than 360°).
  • Reverse (resilient): the outer end of the spring is coiled in the reverse direction for one or more turns (exceeding 360°).

The semi-reverse and reverse types provide extra force at the end of the running period, when the spring is almost out of energy, in order to keep the timepiece running at a constant rate to the end

he mainspring is coiled around an axle called the arbor, with the inner end hooked to it. In many clocks, the outer end is attached to a stationary post. The spring is wound up by turning the arbor, and after winding its force turns the arbor the other way to run the clock. The disadvantage of this open spring arrangement is that while the mainspring is being wound, its drive force is removed from the clock movement, so the clock may stop. This type is often used on alarm clocks, music boxes and kitchen timers where it doesn’t matter if the mechanism stops while winding. The winding mechanism always has a ratchet attached, with a pawl (called by clockmakers the click) to prevent the spring from unwinding.

In the form used in modern watches, called the going barrel, the mainspring is coiled around an arbor and enclosed inside a cylindrical box called the barrel which is free to turn. The spring is attached to the arbor at its inner end, and to the barrel at its outer end. The attachments are small hooks or tabs, which the spring is hooked to by square holes in its ends, so it can be easily replaced.

The mainspring is wound by turning the arbor, but drives the watch movement by the barrel; this arrangement allows the spring to continue powering the watch while it is being wound. Winding the watch turns the arbor, which tightens the mainspring, wrapping it closer around the arbor. The arbor has a ratchet attached to it, with a click to prevent the spring from turning the arbor backward and unwinding. After winding, the arbor is stationary and the pull of the mainspring turns the barrel, which has a ring of gear teeth around it. This meshes with one of the clocks gears, usually the center wheel pinion and drives the wheel train. The barrel usually rotates once every 8 hours, so the common 40-hour spring requires 5 turns to unwind completely.

Half-inch, Oil-tempered Compression Spring

August 7th, 2018

This week’s Katy Spring capability features a half-inch, oil-tempered compression spring, used in the agriculture industry.
Larger springs like these, weighing four-and-a-half pounds each, are stress relieved in large batch ovens.
Heavy-duty wire baskets, like the ones shown in this photograph, are loaded by hand and put into the oven with a forklift.
These heavier springs are too large and require longer baking times to be stressed relieved in an inline oven.

http://www.katyspring.com | 281-391-1888

half-inch, oil-tempered compression spring,

half-inch, oil-tempered compression spring,

Titanium Springs

July 31st, 2018

Titanium extension spring with aircraft approved finish and coating

Titanium is one of the strongest metallic elements, having the highest strength-to-weight ratio of any metal. With its high strength-to-weight ratio, Titanium is as strong as some steels but is almost 50% lighter. With these characteristics, Titanium springs are one of the strongest and most weight-sensitive springs available. Not only are titanium springs exceptionally strong, they are also corrosion resistant. Titanium springs are used in many industries and in many applications, from motor bikes and race cars to aircrafts.

  • Weight Reduction
    The most widely recognized reason to use titanium over steel in a spring application is to lower the overall weight of the end product. Titanium springs can routinely weigh anywhere from 40-60% less than a steel spring used in the same application.
  • Free Length / Pitch Angle
    While most of the weight reduction from using titanium is built into the weight properties of the material itself, the lower torsion modulus of titanium also makes it possible to achieve the same load capacity in a shorter spring design by allowing for a steeper pitch angle on each coil.
  • Corrosion Resistance
    The basic metallurgical properties of titanium allow for a greatly improved resistance to corrosion, thus eliminating the need for costly plating and painting operations that are typically added to alloy steel spring designs.
  • Processing
    While titanium springs are different from traditional steel springs in many ways, it is possible to employ similar post production shot-peening and heat treatment processes to provide greater strength and increase the fatigue life of a titanium spring design.

For more information call 281-391-1888 or visit our website www.katyspring.com

.218 oil-tempered compression spring used in the oil and gas industry

July 24th, 2018

This week’s capability picture features a .218 oil-tempered compression spring used in the oil and gas industry.

The spring has been wheelabrated by Katy Spring’s new wheelabrator. Wheelabrators are designed to blast the spring’s surface which reduces stresses and cleans up microscopic surface imperfections, improving the cycle life of the spring.

http://katyspring.com/ 281-391-1888

218 oil-tempered compression spring used in the oil and gas industry.

218 oil-tempered compression spring used in the oil and gas industry.